Rural community – Indice Rural http://indicerural.com/ Fri, 06 May 2022 18:13:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://indicerural.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-32x32.png Rural community – Indice Rural http://indicerural.com/ 32 32 Nearly 80% shortage of medical specialists in rural community health centers https://indicerural.com/nearly-80-shortage-of-medical-specialists-in-rural-community-health-centers/ Fri, 06 May 2022 14:38:00 +0000 https://indicerural.com/nearly-80-shortage-of-medical-specialists-in-rural-community-health-centers/

The shortage of specialists in community health centers in rural areas has worsened. The total shortage widened to 79.9% in 2021 from 76.1% a year earlier, according to data from the Rural Health Statistics 2020-21 report.

There is a shortage in all specialties, including surgeons, doctors, pediatricians as well as obstetricians and gynecologists. Shortages vary from 74 to 84%. !function(){“use strict”;window.addEventListener(“message”,(function(e){if(void 0!==e.data[“datawrapper-height”]){var …




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First published: Fri 06 May 2022. 20:08 IST

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Sturgeon County First Rural Community to Adopt Clean Energy Retrofit Program – FortSaskOnline.com https://indicerural.com/sturgeon-county-first-rural-community-to-adopt-clean-energy-retrofit-program-fortsaskonline-com/ Thu, 05 May 2022 18:24:08 +0000 https://indicerural.com/sturgeon-county-first-rural-community-to-adopt-clean-energy-retrofit-program-fortsaskonline-com/

It’s a win-win.

Residents of Sturgeon County will soon have the opportunity to lower their utility bills while increasing their property value with a new financing program.


In mid-April, the county council approved the Clean Energy Improvement Program (CEIP) tax settlement. CEIP allows municipalities to provide competitive funding to landowners for energy efficiency and renewable energy improvements.

CEIP will cover up to 100% of project costs and provide reimbursement through the homeowner’s tax bill. If the property is sold before the repayment of the loan, the seller can repay the remaining balance, or the new owner will take charge of the repayment of the CIEP loan as part of the payment of its property tax.

“Passing this program is another example of the county’s commitment to helping residents reduce their environmental impact and reduce their future heating costs,” said Mayor Alanna Hnatiw.

“We are working on local solutions on both the demand and supply side of the energy evolution.”

Initially, CEIP will be available for residential buildings before expanding to non-residential buildings such as commercial buildings and farms.

Once the bylaw is passed, the county administration will work with CEIP’s facilitator, the Alberta Municipal Services Corporation, which will provide technical support throughout program development and lead essential tasks. These tasks will include application and processing, website management, participant and contractor customer service, contractor onboarding, and marketing and engagement.

Sturgeon County expects residents to be able to access the program in early 2023.

Some neighboring communities have already adopted the CEIP programme; the Town of Leduc adopted a CEIP by-law on April 12, 2021, with the intention of launching the program in late spring. The City of Edmonton launched its residential CIEP program on March 29, with plans to roll out a commercial program later this year.

Sturgeon County is the first rural community to adopt CEIP.

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The murder of Emilhle Tukani galvanizes the rural community… https://indicerural.com/the-murder-of-emilhle-tukani-galvanizes-the-rural-community/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 17:08:20 +0000 https://indicerural.com/the-murder-of-emilhle-tukani-galvanizes-the-rural-community/

As raging floods in KwaZulu-Natal dominated the media space, a little story on the rape and murder of Emile Tukani, 12 years old in a village near Mthatha in the Eastern Cape went almost unnoticed. It is perhaps worth noting that it has received the least attention, as incidents of gender-based violence in the Eastern Cape, including against young girls and boys, are tragically high.

I happened to be at the Emilhle memorial service and was surprised by what was highlighted about the event in the media compared to my experience. For the most part, there seemed to be a focus on the gruesome details of the crime, followed by an emphasis on the drug problem in the villages. What the reports lacked was the context in which this crime occurred and the resilience and resources that were mobilized within the community on very short notice.

Emihle’s home village of Mputhi, part of Bhaziya Traditional Council in King Sabata Dalindyebo Municipality, is about 45 minutes from Mthatha. The landscape is painfully beautiful, with colorful huts scattered on hills, against the backdrop of the blue mountains of Bhaziya. Mist rises from the mountains early in the morning, giving the villages a deeply peaceful atmosphere.

My team and I spent several weeks in these villages, going from house to house trying to better understand the relationship that people have with their traditional leader in relation to a series of problems.

While we were there, the tragic death of Emilhle occurred. We first heard about it from Nkosi Minenkulu Joyi, the senior traditional leader of the Bhaziya Traditional Council. This was not the only story of unimaginable violence we heard during the weeks we were in King Sabata Dalindyebo Municipality, but it is the only one in which such swift action was taken.

Nkosi Joyi interrupted his university studies at the age of 25 when his father died, and he was forced to assume the position of traditional leader of the traditional council. In his 10 years as a traditional leader, he worked hard against near impossible odds to bring resources and development to his community.

Jumba’s traditional council is near Bhaziya, and here Nkosi Nokhaka Jumba, one of the women to take on the leadership role, is similarly striving to change the circumstances of the people she serves while transforming the institution from within to become more gender sensitive.

The ancient homeland of Transkei remains one of the least developed regions of our country. The unemployment rate is around 70% and the level of dependency on social assistance is high. Small-scale agricultural activities are affected by weather conditions, including several years of drought followed by unusually heavy rains last summer.

Drug and substance abuse is very high. As we slipped and slid down the muddy gravel roads, we encountered young men who were obviously intoxicated at all times of the day. The assumption is that without anything better to do, turning to drug addiction is inevitable. The assumption is further that once ‘high’, involvement in criminal activity, including gender-based violence, is also inevitable.

On the surface, causal links can be assumed. But in reality, these things are much more complex. It has become almost taboo on popular platforms in South Africa to talk about the legacy of apartheid. But I don’t think we can begin to unravel the high levels of gender-based violence in the villages of the former Transkei without talking about the legacy of apartheid: the tearing apart of families through forced migrant labor, the absence of fathers, the emasculation of black men, the systematic underdevelopment of the old homelands, and the resulting disruption of social order.

I was in the Eastern Cape as part of a research team, led by the University of Ghana and in partnership with the University of Pretoria, which was studying women traditional leaders across the continent. During our meeting with traditional chiefs, women and men, we became aware of how their authority has been systematically reduced without anything else replacing it.

The subject of the diminishing power and authority of traditional chiefs is the subject of another article, but suffice it to say here that where traditional chiefs have played a vital role in holding the social fabric of one community, rural communities are now floundering without direction. When speaking to household members, one senses that there is a sense of abandonment under the “new dispensation”.

In this context, when the terrible story of the death of Emilhle Tukani emerged, what was significant was not the horrific details of her death, but the fact that the community took action. Led by Nkosi Joyi, within days of the tragedy, critical actors from all sides were mobilized to address the issue. Grassroots civil society organizations, religious leaders, political party leaders and members of the South African Police, including at the provincial level, were present.

Several traditional leaders in King Sabata Dalindyebo Municipality have set up foundations to raise funds to support their development work. But beyond trying to lift their communities out of poverty, these leaders are also tackling the sense of directionlessness and abandonment in rural villages of former homelands.

Four days after Emilhle’s death was reported in the media, News24 reported on the 38.5 million rand spent over the past 10 years planning and designing a government complex in Bisho which is still “just an empty lot”.

In our conversations with traditional leaders, we heard very few complaints about the government or the lack of funding provided to support the work of traditional leaders. What we heard is what the dreams of these traditional leaders are in terms of community development that they know and understand well.

Nkosi Joyi, for example, dreams of creating a center near the Royal House (instead of 45 minutes to Mthatha – an impossible distance for people living on R350 a month) where domestic affairs, leisure facilities and workers social could be established to address community issues as they arise.

Nkosi Jumba sees traditional courts being able to respond more quickly to problems before they escalate once the Traditional Courts Bill is passed.

If there is meaning to be drawn from a tragedy like the rape and murder of a 12-year-old girl, then let’s make sure we work actively to prevent it from happening again. The locals reminded us time and time again that we were in the region where our great leaders, Nelson Mandela and Walter Sisulu came from, but their home communities have been forgotten.

Emilhle’s death is not some strange rural event, it is a direct symptom of apartheid and the deep inequalities that we continue to maintain, and thus becomes the responsibility of each one of us. DM

The fieldwork referred to is part of a continent-wide research project on women traditional leaders and political representation, funded by the Andrew W Mellon Foundation and led by a team from the Legon Center for International Affairs and Diplomacy from the University of Ghana in partnership with the universities of Pretoria and Makerere. The cases under consideration include those from Ghana, Liberia, Botswana and South Africa.

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Rural community outside Scottsdale divided over its water future https://indicerural.com/rural-community-outside-scottsdale-divided-over-its-water-future/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 11:45:00 +0000 https://indicerural.com/rural-community-outside-scottsdale-divided-over-its-water-future/

Editor’s Note: This is the fourth in a five-part series titled “KTAR Water Watch,” which will explore the present and future of water supply across Arizona and the metro area. of Phoenix.

PHOENIX – Rio Verde Foothills has a water problem.

The rural community located more than 30 miles northeast of Scottsdale in an unincorporated county gets its water from wells on the property or from water tanks filled by haul trucks.

For decades, Scottsdale has been one of the main suppliers of water for these trucks. That changed last year.

The city announced that by the end of the year, residents of Rio Verde Foothills will no longer use Scottsdale as a source for their hauled water.

According to Scottsdale, it was a move that had been in the works for some time. The drought did not help the arrangement, according to Scottsdale Water executive director Brian Biesemeyer.

Rio Verde Foothills resident Linda Vinson was caught off guard.

“We had heard a little about this or maybe that, but when we heard it for sure…it was pretty scary,” she said. “That’s when we found out about the DWID effort.”

DWID, or Domestic Water Improvement District, is one of the ideas for the water future of the Rio Verde foothills.

Sarah Porter, director of ASU’s Kyl Center for Water Policy, describes it as “a government entity with the power to acquire water supplies and obtain funding to develop water distribution or treatment infrastructure. some water”.

For Rio Verde Foothills residents like Karen Nabity, a DWID wasn’t a new idea. She got involved in the effort to form one in 2018.

“Our group is looking for an outside water source that we can bring,” she said. “So that those people who depend on water transported can always have a source of water.”

Nabity relies on hauled water for her home, as does Meredith Deangelis, who has used her public relations background to promote the pro-DWID effort.

“There must be five people who sit on the water district board…voted by the community [and] overseen by Maricopa County,” she said. “It’s not like this is a company that’s going to come in here and try to do rate hikes.”

A DWID is not favored by everyone in the community.

Christy Jackman, a Rio Verde Foothills for 13 years, has been skeptical of the idea for a year. She’s a vocal adversary.

Not only is Jackman worried about the level of control the DWID might have, but she thinks the optional nature of the community’s proposed water district would leave some residents vulnerable.

“[I started] collect signatures against him,” she said. “In the space of about two weeks, I got 660 signatures from residents here and turned them over to the board of supervisors.”

A home water improvement district may be proposed by residents and the Maricopa County Board of Supervisors must implement it.

The area supervisor at the time, Republican Steve Chucri, began holding neighborhood meetings.

Linda Vinson, who supports DWID, was at some of these meetings.

“There was a big vocal group against and a group for,” Vinson recalled. “The meeting was less than cordial.

Amy Wolff was one of the residents against the DWID. She thinks both sides have made their case well, but she still doesn’t believe DWID is the answer.

“There’s a lot of history here,” Wolff said. “I’ve been here almost 17 years and every few years someone comes up with some sort of plan to control the water.”

A big issue for Wolff is control.

“I moved here because I hate HOAs,” she laughs. “I certainly don’t want a government entity formed by neighbors…it’s more about personal freedom.”

Wolff also says she would much rather continue using private water carriers than enter into a DWID.

“I can be my own consumer,” she says. “There are already water carriers all over the state that kind of advertised here.”

John Hornewer, a Rio Verde Foothills resident and water hauler himself, disagrees with this sentiment. He supports DWID because of his experience with other home water improvement districts in the state.

“Until we have dedicated water, we will always be vulnerable to being in this position,” he says. “Private utilities won’t be dedicated to water…we’re just throwing the box on the road.”

Discussions between the two sides of the DWID debate came to a halt in September 2021, however, when supervisor Steve Chucri resigned following comments he made about the other supervisors’ handling of the 2020 election audit.

The replacement for the former Chucri supervisor, Thomas Galvin, was appointed months later in December 2021. In the minds of some residents who support the DWID, he is not moving fast enough on the issue of the foothills of the Rio Verde .

Some residents therefore decided to sue the county in an attempt to speed up the process.

“All we want is for them to put us, in a timely manner, on their agenda so they can vote yes or no on the DWID,” Deangelis said.

DWID opponent Christy Jackman disagrees and thinks Supervisor Galvin is just taking her time to consider the matter.

“He thought about it and he studied it,” she says. “I appreciate his efforts to go slow and get it right.”

Maricopa County declined to comment due to the ongoing lawsuit.

New District 2 Supervisor Thomas Galvin spoke about the water situation in the Rio Verde foothills just months after his appointment.

Galvin said he was looking to learn more about the issue and weigh each option.

“There’s still plenty of water for everyone in Arizona,” he said. “I don’t want people to panic or anyone to think we’re running out of water.”

He also clarified his commitment.

“Residents deserve someone to come and help them find a solution quickly and properly,” Galvin said at the time. “I intend to be that person.”

Nabity is afraid that time is running out.

“We need to be in intergovernmental agreements that usually take over a year to put in place, and have them in contracts by June,” Nabity said. “We need approval now.”

We want to hear from you.

Do you have a story idea or advice? Pass it on to the KTAR News team here.

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Rural community mobilizes to build classrooms, sell livestock and use grant money https://indicerural.com/rural-community-mobilizes-to-build-classrooms-sell-livestock-and-use-grant-money/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 10:08:15 +0000 https://indicerural.com/rural-community-mobilizes-to-build-classrooms-sell-livestock-and-use-grant-money/
  • A parent who has five children at a school sold goats and contributed R1,500 in cash to raise money to improve facilities
  • Parents contributed whatever they could afford to ensure their children received an education
  • The school director congratulates the parents and asks the competent authorities to complete what the parents have started
  • Most of the parents and guardians who have contributed are unemployed and hope the Ministry of Education will notice their efforts

PAY ATTENTION: Follow Briefly News on Twitter and never miss the hottest topics! Find us on @brieflyza!

By Lloyd Dlongolo – Independent Journalist

Education is often seen as the golden ticket to a better life. This story was reflected in reality by a rural community after they mobilized and built classrooms for their children.

Left: Principal of Chabasa JSS in the Swazini area of ​​Port St Johns. Right: The classroom built by Chabasa JSS. Photos: provided.
Source: UGC

But where did they get the funds from?

Troubled by the fact that their children had no classroom, parents of pupils at Chabasa JSS in the Swazini area of ​​Port St Johns in the Eastern Cape sought solutions. In 2010, the government built three temporary structures to house grades R through 7. But the structures have not stood the test of time.

Read also

The Ambitious 7: Meet a group of women who help build and furnish homes for parents

Do you like reading our stories? Download the BRIEFLY NEWS app on Google Play now and stay up to date with top South African news!

The parents then went knocking on the doors of the Ministry of Education with begging bowls. They did not attract any sympathy. Their desperate pleas for help from the government yielded no results and they literally took matters into their own hands.

Some have sold their expensive livestock while others have paid their entire subsidy.

It should be noted that most of the parents and guardians of the six villages that supply the school are unemployed and live from agriculture, but they did not hesitate to contribute to the cause.

Rural community mobilizes to build classrooms, sell livestock and use grant money
One of the parents, Zingisile Sadula, who contributed to the class. Photo: provided.
Source: UGC

Their efforts were generously rewarded as they managed to build classrooms for the school’s more than 270 learners.

One parent, Zingisile Sadula, knows the struggle is all too real. He has five children at school and they have complained in the past about their school environment.

Read also

Video clip of Shoprite truck being looted at KZN causes online stir: ‘What barbaric behaviour’

“I contributed R1,500 to the cause. I also sold goats and contributed again using the money from the sales,” Sadula said.

“It really hurt me that the department is dragging its feet to provide more classrooms for students. Education is a basic human right,” added Sadula, who is also vice chair of the board of trustees. school.

Sadula added that there was a school nearby but the safety of her children and others was a priority.

“There is a huge forest and the safety of our children comes first. We hope the Ministry of Education will see how seriously we take our children’s education. We want our children to have a bright future and education is a good step in that direction. This school has good teachers and our children get rave reviews when they get to other schools,” he said.

The parents, however, failed to raise enough funds to build the entire school. The lack of classrooms is still glaring. They are not afraid of the obstacle that awaits them. They are now working on plastering the exterior of the classrooms.

Read also

Black teenager offered R60m in scholarships after inventing device for blind people

Chabasa JSS director Sidima Mvumvu reiterated that he had sent several letters to the Ministry of Education asking for intervention, but his efforts fell on a rock.

“Teachers must spend at least 30 minutes in classrooms so that another teacher can come after. This is not viable or conducive as it details learning. The school needs urgent help from relevant authorities as well as the business community,” he said. .

Grades 1 and 2, as well as 5 and 6, share bedrooms in the newly constructed space, while Grade R occupies the last classroom.

Staff are cramped in one of the temporary structure classrooms with Grade 7 students.

In the midst of all this, parents have shown and proven that education is the greatest gift they can give their children. even if it means sacrificing their precious livestock.

Parents build classrooms for kids, leave SA inspired and frustrated

Read also

Teenage sisters make a difference by collecting uniforms for struggling students in their community

This wasn’t the first time parents had to take matters into their own hands. In brief News previously reported that the parents of the children at Jumba Senior Secondary School in Mthatha have taken the initiative to build additional classrooms at the school for their children.

Online, a man with the @ghettostyler Twitter account shared a photo of builders working in classrooms. In the caption, he explained that the parents of the children who would use the classrooms decided to build it for them.

Source: News in Brief

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Irish history: A rural community survived a millennium of plagues and famines https://indicerural.com/irish-history-a-rural-community-survived-a-millennium-of-plagues-and-famines/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 18:00:26 +0000 https://indicerural.com/irish-history-a-rural-community-survived-a-millennium-of-plagues-and-famines/

Analysis of pollen stored in peat at Slieveanorra in the Antrim Hills reveals the resilience of a rural community in the face of environmental change

Humans


April 27, 2022

The boggy uplands of Northern Ireland were once forested and farmed

Helen Essell, CC-BY 4.0

A rural Irish community has survived a succession of climate change and other threats over the past 1,000 years, a study of pollen stored in peat has found. The discovery suggests that societies can endure despite environmental changes, if they are flexible enough to adapt their way of life.

The Irish have experienced many upheavals over the past millennium. These include the European Famine of 1315-17, the Black Death of 1348-49, and the Irish Potato Famine of 1845-52. There have also been climatic changes, including the transition from the relatively warm medieval climate anomaly to the slightly cooler Little Ice Age.

To find out more about how people dealt with these events, Gill Plunkett and Graeme Swindles of Queen’s University Belfast in the UK studied an archaeological site called Slieveanorra in the Hills of Antrim, which is now part of North Ireland. It is an upland bog, surrounded on three sides by ridges.

“If you go up today, it’s deserted,” Plunkett says, but there are abandoned houses and signs of farming.

Plunkett and Swindles studied pollen from a peat core in Slieveanorra to find out what plants have grown there over the past 1,000 years. They found evidence of human interference everywhere, such as fewer trees than expected, more pasture plants and grain crops.

The team also saw pollen from plants in the cannabis family, which includes hemp. “I think we probably produced hemp and flax as well,” Plunkett says, possibly for the textile industry.

The small community has gone through multiple crises. The famine and plague of the 1300s were associated with increased land use, suggesting that any reduction in population was temporary. The only time the site may have been abandoned was during a wet period in the mid-1400s, for a generation or two, but after that agriculture resumed and even increased.

It was not until the early 1900s that farming ceased. Plunkett thinks it was because people saw better opportunities elsewhere, rather than the area becoming uninhabitable.

It is unclear why the community of Slieveanorra was so resilient, but Plunkett says one reason may be that there were no landlords or landlords, at least until the late 1800s. This meant that the people who lived there were free to change their way of life, for example by hunting more when the crops were growing badly – instead of having to send a certain amount of grain to a feudal lord.

Journal reference: PLoS OneDOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0266680

Learn more about these topics:

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Former science teacher pursuing medical studies in population-based urban and rural community health https://indicerural.com/former-science-teacher-pursuing-medical-studies-in-population-based-urban-and-rural-community-health/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 10:22:11 +0000 https://indicerural.com/former-science-teacher-pursuing-medical-studies-in-population-based-urban-and-rural-community-health/

From a very young age, Stella Barth dreamed of becoming a doctor. As a student, she turned to science classes and research. But after earning a bachelor’s degree in neurobiology from Harvard College, she took a different path.

The Stoneham native taught science for eight years, first at Newton Country Day School in Newton, then at the Williams School in New London, Connecticut, before arriving at TH Chan School of Medicine the last fall.

“Medical school was always something that was still on my mind,” Barth said. “I finally decided to apply to medical school and UMass Chan. The school really jumped out at me. Being from Massachusetts, I felt they really appreciated that students from the Massachusetts come to train as doctors within the Worcester County community.

Barth is a first generation university and medical student. She is part of the Population-Based Urban and Rural Community Health (PURCH) stream, which focuses on population health, health care disparities, and health issues specific to urban and rural communities. She chose the PURCH track because the tight-knit community resembled her community of teachers. Students in this program study alongside physicians from Baystate Health.

“We get these one-on-one sessions with them where we talk with them and then we can actually go see patients with them,” Barth said. “I already feel like I’ve developed a good relationship with my preceptor and his patients, and I feel like it’s just the intimate contact with the clinical community that you want in a program like this. this.

Between teaching and medical school, Barth worked as a clinical research coordinator in a spinal cord injury research laboratory at Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital and completed a post-baccalaureate pre-medical program at Harvard. She was able to work with patients with spinal cord injuries and observe their evolution over time. After her medical studies, she wants to practice neurological physical medicine and rehabilitation.

Last fall, Barth presented the results of his research on spinal cord injury at two national conferences: the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and the Society for Neuroscience. She said it’s important to learn about health care through individuals within communities and what they need over time because that changes.

“Working with people with a wide variety of spinal cord injuries and paralysis has taught me a lot about how people adapt to continue interacting with their environment when their bodies don’t behave like they used to. “, Barth said. “I am very dedicated to working with people with neurological injuries and other functional deficits.”

Barth thrives on the path she has taken and she also encourages others to follow their dream.

“I am an older, non-traditional student. It doesn’t matter how long you haven’t been to school,” she said. “I took a decade off before going to medical school, and I wouldn’t have it any other way.”

Current articles related to UMass Chan:
Medical student examines social determinants of health screening tools in emergency departments
BaccMD graduate wants to serve marginalized populations, expand access to health care
By emphasizing human rights, the medical student aims to give voice to

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Chambers Pen hails government plans to develop deep rural community – Jamaica Observer https://indicerural.com/chambers-pen-hails-government-plans-to-develop-deep-rural-community-jamaica-observer/ Sat, 23 Apr 2022 17:14:31 +0000 https://indicerural.com/chambers-pen-hails-government-plans-to-develop-deep-rural-community-jamaica-observer/

Terran Cottrell points to the playing field in the community which he says needs improvement.

CHAMBERS PEN, Hanover – Residents and stakeholders of the deep rural community of Chambers Pen in Hanover have welcomed the government’s recent announcement that it intends to develop the district into the first model community as part of its rural development program of approximately $700 million in five parishes.

“They are now making it a model community, of course. So we’re just waiting and the community will do whatever it’s supposed to do to make sure we reach the highest level. That’s where we are now, said Jeremiah Grant, principal of Chambers Pen Primary and Infant School.

On a tour of the area last Thursday, Local Government and Rural Development Minister Desmond McKenzie said ‘Chambers Pen will be – what I want to call – the guinea pig’.

“So we are using Chambers Pen as a test pilot for this project.”

Similar to residents and stakeholders, Hanover Western Member of Parliament (MP) Tamika Davis is equally excited. However, in reference to McKenzie’s term “guinea pig”, Davis said everything would be done to ensure the project does not fall into a trial-and-error initiative that could result in cost overruns and the aggrieved community. .

Under the Rural Development Program initiative, the five communities in different parts of the island, starting with Chambers Pen, will begin to see, within the next three months, massive improvements in their social and economic lives.

The other four communities that will benefit from the initiative are Cheesefield in St Catherine, Cheswick in St Thomas, Lawrence Tavern in West Rural St Andrew’s constituency and a community in Clarendon.

Under this program, the government is expected to install water, electricity, internet and construction of roads, community parks and indigent housing, aiming to breathe new life into these rural communities.

A Chambers Pen resident, who did not want to be named, told the Jamaica Observer West that she looks forward in particular to the upgrading and refurbishment of Chambers Pen Primary School, the construction of better roads and the provision of internet service.

She noted that there is currently no fiber in the area and therefore their only means of broadband Internet service is through wireless service offered by a local company, which she says is unreliable.

In addition, the woman also longs for the return of the postal agency, which was closed more than 10 years ago, leaving residents no alternative but to travel around 20 minutes to Hannover’s capital, Lucea, to access the postal service.

Another resident, Tressan Cottrell, who describes the community as “a peaceful, crime-free area”, highlighted the need for a youth club and improving the soccer field, which he said , would help maintain unity in the region.

The manager of the Chambers Pen football team also spoke of the need to build a basketball court, fence the property and install lights that would facilitate night games on the community playground.

Cottrell also called for more job opportunities in the area.

McKenzie said that under the program, an undisclosed number of temporary and permanent job opportunities will be created. He noted that after the completion of the project, a maintenance component of the project will be implemented.

Although there are other churches in the neighboring communities of Chambers Pen, Chambers Pen Seventh-day Adventist Church is the only church in the community, which has a population of just over 1,200, while the school Chambers Pen Primary and Infant is also the only school in the area.

The school, which has 75 students, was built more than 50 years ago and is made up of concrete walls and wooden floors.

“The structure is kind of not in the best of situations but, again, we’re trying to make the most of it. And, even the schoolyard as you can see seems to be in a state of disarray , but we are trying to get more space,” said Grant, who pointed out that improvements have been made to the facility in recent years, citing the move from pit latrines to flush toilets, between others.

The deputy agreed that the school needed repairs.

She told the Western Observer that “the roof leaks and the wooden floor is not structurally sound to walk on in some areas, making it unsafe for students”.

However, she is optimistic that under the scheme ‘Chambers Pen Primary School will benefit’.

“They’re really going to do major repairs to the primary school. There is also no recreation area. The yard, although large, is not conducive to play,” she said.

Davis noted that the school’s population is small because parents send their children out of the community due to poor infrastructure in the area, “which puts a strain on parents and stresses children. “.

“So we want to make it a place where people who are from the area will stay and even attract other people. And this is how we develop our parish. Doing so will also ease the burden of Lucea, which is rapidly becoming overcrowded, and give the residents of Chambers Pen a reason to stay.

In the meantime, McKenzie said, “the municipal corporation will be the executing agency for the project. The Ministry [Local Government and Rural Development] through its technical team, the SDC [Social Development Commission)]ODPEM [Office of Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Management] and other agencies, will be part of the program…”

Former St James Municipal Corporation Chairman Homer Davis, Minister of State for Local Government and the Department of Rural Development, has overall responsibility for the implementation of the programme.

DAVIS… everything will be done so that the project does not fall into a process of trial and error

A section of the main road riddled with potholes in the community

MCKENZIE… Chambers Pen will be – what I want to call – the guinea pig

The building that once housed the community post office

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Hundreds of people flock to learn about the police at the first-ever rural community showcase https://indicerural.com/hundreds-of-people-flock-to-learn-about-the-police-at-the-first-ever-rural-community-showcase/ Fri, 22 Apr 2022 09:05:00 +0000 https://indicerural.com/hundreds-of-people-flock-to-learn-about-the-police-at-the-first-ever-rural-community-showcase/

Taking advantage of the beautiful Easter weekend weather, hundreds of visitors attended Saturday’s first rural community showcase at the Newark Showground.

The event, hosted by Nottinghamshire Police and Police and Crime Commissioner Caroline Henry, allowed visitors to learn about the various police teams working to keep them safe, mountain bikes and underwater search teams to the force rescue drone unit.

Visitors also took the opportunity to speak directly with officers and other local partners about key local issues and concerns.

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The event allowed visitors to learn more about Nottinghamshire’s various police teams.

The event was organized as part of the force’s new rural crime strategy, which led to the assignment of additional officers and specialist resources to rural areas.

Chief Inspector Heather Maelor, of Nottinghamshire Police, said: ‘We have listened to people who live and work in the countryside and worked on ways to address the very real concerns they have about the crime.

“We are taking steps to ensure that we provide the best and most agile service possible and we are starting to see very encouraging results.

“Neighborhood policing of this nature is also about building strong local connections and being visible in the communities we serve.

Firefighters were also present to answer questions.

“This event was intended to put us in front of the general public and allow them to see for themselves some of the resources we are devoting to their safety.

“I was delighted with how the event went and hope to do it all again next year.”

Police and Crime Commissioner Caroline Henry said: ‘I have always been determined that we are tough on rural and wildlife crime.

“That’s why we’ve been working hard to develop a new plan that will do just that.

The first event was hailed as a huge success.

“Our new plan, which includes dedicated police, equipment and training, will stop rural criminals in their tracks.

“It was great presenting our rural crime strategy over the weekend and talking with the residents.

“It is really important that people in rural communities know that we have listened and taken their concerns seriously.

“Our new action plan details exactly how we will continue to help rural communities tackle rural crime and wildlife crime – our rural community showcase is just part of that.”

Read more

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Police are investigating ‘extremist leaflets’ posted in mailboxes in Br…

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Success for Nottinghamshire’s first rural community showcase https://indicerural.com/success-for-nottinghamshires-first-rural-community-showcase/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 11:24:52 +0000 https://indicerural.com/success-for-nottinghamshires-first-rural-community-showcase/

Families, farmers and other rural residents had the chance to meet local police officers and learn more about their work during a day of fun and activities.

Making the most of the beautiful Easter weekend weather, hundreds of visitors attended Saturday’s first rural community showcase at the Newark Showground.

The event, hosted by Nottinghamshire Police and Police and Crime Commissioner Caroline Henry, allowed visitors to learn about the various police teams working to keep them safe, mountain bikes and underwater search teams to the force rescue drone unit.

Visitors also took the opportunity to speak directly with officers and other local partners about key local issues and concerns.

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The event was organized as part of the force’s new rural crime strategy, which led to the assignment of additional officers and specialist resources to rural areas.

Chief Inspector Heather Maelor, of Nottinghamshire Police, said: ‘We have listened to people who live and work in the countryside and worked on ways to address the very real concerns they have about the crime.

“We are taking steps to ensure that we provide the best and most agile service possible and we are starting to see very encouraging results.

Screenshot 2022 04 21 at 12.19.59

“Neighborhood policing of this nature is also about building strong local connections and being visible in the communities we serve. This event was meant to put us in front of the general public and allow them to see for themselves some of the resources we dedicate to their safety.

“I was delighted with how the event went and hope to do it all again next year.”

Police and Crime Commissioner Caroline Henry said: “As Police and Crime Commissioner, I have always been determined that we get tough on rural and wildlife crime.

“That’s why we’ve been working hard to develop a new plan that will do just that. Our new plan, which includes dedicated police, equipment and training, will stop rural criminals in their tracks.

“It was great presenting our rural crime strategy over the weekend and talking with the residents. It is really important that people in rural communities know that we have listened and taken their concerns seriously.

“Our new action plan details exactly how we will continue to help rural communities tackle rural crime and wildlife crime – our rural community showcase is just part of that.”

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