Rural economy – Indice Rural http://indicerural.com/ Sun, 08 May 2022 17:52:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://indicerural.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-32x32.png Rural economy – Indice Rural http://indicerural.com/ 32 32 MP for Penrith calls on PM to support rural economy https://indicerural.com/mp-for-penrith-calls-on-pm-to-support-rural-economy/ Sat, 07 May 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://indicerural.com/mp-for-penrith-calls-on-pm-to-support-rural-economy/ An MP for Cumbria, along with more than 30 other MPs and peers, has written to the Prime Minister asking him to support the rural economy.

Dr Neil Hudson, MP for Penrith and The Border, joined the group who wrote to Johnson asking him to present a new white paper designed to grow the rural economy, following the release of a major new report by a multi-stakeholder group.

The All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on Rural Business and the Rural Powerhouse released a report last week outlining how £43billion could be added to the UK economy.

The report, titled ‘Leveling up the rural economy’, sets out 27 clear steps to unlock the economic potential of the countryside, adding up to £43billion in gross value added (GVA).

Now MPs and peers from across the political spectrum are calling on Johnson to lead a government-wide effort to unlock business potential in rural communities.

Hudson said: “The government needs to start being ambitious for the rural economy.

“I want to see Penrith and The Border thrive.

“I want it to be a place where people can afford to live, get a good job and achieve their aspirations.

“Penrith and The Border is one of the most rural parts of the country, and we are a hugely enterprising group, but with, but too often, the specific needs of areas like ours are overlooked in national policy-making.

“85% of rural businesses are not engaged in agriculture or forestry, and they often face structural barriers to success.

“Given that 23% of all businesses in England are based in the countryside, and many more in the other three UK countries, it is clear that removing these barriers could generate considerable economic growth, for the good of their local communities. and the country as a whole. »

In a separate letter to Johnson, the Country Land and Business Association (CLA) and the Federation of Small Businesses added their support for major government reform.

The letter said: “We are deeply ambitious for rural Britain.

“The countryside is not a museum, it is an economic power in its own right.

“We believe in the extraordinary potential of rural communities to create opportunity and prosperity for everyone, regardless of background or circumstance.”

READ MORE: MP for Penrith is delighted to hear about police recruitment statistics

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FREE EVENT: How can conservatives grow the rural economy? https://indicerural.com/free-event-how-can-conservatives-grow-the-rural-economy/ Fri, 06 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://indicerural.com/free-event-how-can-conservatives-grow-the-rural-economy/

You are cordially invited to our next ConservativeHome Live event, organized in partnership with the Country Land and Business Associationexploring the subject:

Rural Central – How can the Conservatives grow the rural economy?

Join us for free, via Zoom, from 7-8:15 p.m. Tuesday, May 10 to hear from a panel of experts including:

  • Julian Sturdy MPChairman of APPG for Rural Business and Rural Powerhouse
  • Selaine Saxby, MPMP for North Devon
  • jonathan robertDirector of External Affairs, CLA
  • Paul BonmanConservativeHome Editor-in-Chief (Chair)

A recent report by the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Rural Power found that the rural economy is 18% less productive than the national average – it is estimated that if this gap were to be reduced it could add up to £43billion to the UK United economy. What are the current limits to rural productivity and growth, and how can they be overcome? What are the opportunities that could arise from upgrading rural areas?

Finding an effective answer to these economic questions is also a political challenge – a recent poll found that Labor and the Conservatives are now neck and neck among rural voters.

register here to ask your questions to our panel and to debate how best Conservatives deliver prosperity and opportunity in the countryside.

CuratorHome Live Country Land and Business Association Campaign Economy Agricultural Growth Julian Sturdy MP Productivity Rural Affairs Selaine Saxby MP Tourism

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MPs and peers unite to call for action on the rural economy https://indicerural.com/mps-and-peers-unite-to-call-for-action-on-the-rural-economy/ Wed, 04 May 2022 07:31:18 +0000 https://indicerural.com/mps-and-peers-unite-to-call-for-action-on-the-rural-economy/

More than 30 MPs and peers have written to the Prime Minister calling for a new government-wide effort to unlock the potential of the rural economy.

Parliamentarians from across the political spectrum are urging Boris Johnson to take a range of actions to realize the potential of rural communities.

It follows a recent report by the All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on the Rural Powerhouse, which conducted a year-long survey of the health of the rural economy.

The report, titled ‘Leveling up the rural economy’, sets out 27 measures to unlock the economic potential of the British countryside.

The cross-party group of MPs and peers has urged the UK government to dramatically increase its ambition for prosperity in the countryside.

In the new letter, coordinated by MP for York Outer Julian Sturdy, the parliamentarians said: ‘85% of rural businesses are not engaged in agriculture or forestry, and they often face structural barriers to their success .

“Given that 23% of all businesses in England are based in the countryside (and many more in the other three countries), it is clear that removing these barriers could generate considerable economic growth, for the benefit of their communities. local and country. in its entirety.”

In a separate letter to Mr Johnson, the Country Land and Business Association (CLA) and the Federation of Small Businesses added their support for major government reform.

The letter said: “We are deeply ambitious for rural Britain. The countryside is not a museum, it is an economic power in its own right.

“We believe in the extraordinary potential of rural communities to create opportunity and prosperity for everyone, regardless of background or circumstance.”

CLA President Mark Tufnell said the country can no longer afford to ignore the potential of the rural economy and the prospects of the millions of people who live there.

He warned that the cost of living crisis was compounded by the obstacles facing rural businesses.

“Rural businesses are poised to grow, creating good jobs and opportunities for people from all walks of life – but a lack of government interest is holding them back.

“The policies needed to generate new economic growth are neither expensive nor complex – they only require political will.”

He added: ‘It is time for Downing Street to show ambition and deliver measures designed explicitly to spread opportunity and prosperity in rural Britain.’

Federation of Small Business Advocacy Chair Tina McKenzie explained that rural businesses cover a wide range of sectors and industries.

“During the lockdown we also saw a new wave of home-based start-ups that have now taken off, many of which started life as a hobby,” she said.

“All of these thriving businesses based in rural areas are a vital part of the economy that needs to be nurtured.”

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Parliamentary group launches major report on rural economy https://indicerural.com/parliamentary-group-launches-major-report-on-rural-economy/ Tue, 03 May 2022 14:03:23 +0000 https://indicerural.com/parliamentary-group-launches-major-report-on-rural-economy/
All-Party Parliamentary Group on The Rural Powerhouse releases £43billion plan for economic growth in the countryside

The All Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on the Rural Powerhouse has released a new report on how to upgrade the rural economy.

It follows one of the most comprehensive surveys ever conducted by a parliamentary body into the health of the rural economy. The APPG collected testimonials from more than 50 industry bodies, charities, campaign groups, businesses, academics and business leaders. The report concludes that no government in recent memory has had a program to unlock the economic and social potential of the countryside.

As a result, the rural economy is 18% less productive than the national average. A gap which, if narrowed, could add £43bn to the UK economy.

The report’s findings included the finding of a failing planning system that failed those who live and work in rural areas. Defra also lacks the policy levers needed to bring about meaningful change in the rural economy. A lack of skills supply is causing a rapid “brain drain” in rural areas, and urgent action is needed to address labor shortages and the pricing powers of supermarkets. On top of that, the government is also backing away from commitments to provide full fiber and 4G to all, and the current tax system discourages business investment and diversification.

APPG on Rural Business and the Rural Powerhouse co-chair and MP for York Outer, Julian Sturdy, said that,

“This report lays out a comprehensive growth plan that will create jobs, expand opportunities and strengthen small towns and villages across the country. We recognize the unique set of challenges facing government today, but this makes the need to develop and strengthen the rural economy more important, not less important.

Julian’s co-chair, Lord Cameron of Dillington, added:

“It is vital that the government understands that rural Britain is not a museum, but rather an important part of the national economy which deserves a chance to succeed. The report provides an economic blueprint which will help any government to derive leverage the capabilities of the countryside and create the long-term economic growth needed to stimulate/enrich/strengthen our rural communities – in a cost effective and timely manner.

Commenting on the lack of affordability in the campaign, CLA President Mark Tufnell points out,

“The country can no longer afford to ignore the potential of the rural economy and the prospects of the millions of people who live there. Rural businesses are poised to grow, creating good jobs and opportunities for people from all walks of life, but lack of government interest is holding them back. Houses are often unaffordable for local families. Well-paying jobs can be rare. And broadband can be extremely slow. All of this leads to an exodus of talent who are too often forced to move to more urban areas.

The Rural Services Network testified at the inquiry and is regularly quoted in the report.

The full report can be downloaded here

The full article published on the CLA website is available here

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Village youth to promote rural economy, tourism https://indicerural.com/village-youth-to-promote-rural-economy-tourism/ Mon, 02 May 2022 17:01:29 +0000 https://indicerural.com/village-youth-to-promote-rural-economy-tourism/

The state government aims to promote the local economy and rural tourism with the help of groups of young people formed at the village level and aptly named Yuvak and Mahila Mangal Dals, who will be trained as “Paryatan Mitra “.

During his first term, Yogi Adityanath Government Tourism Policy-2018 made special mention of the village, agro-tourism and Mangal Dals.

During its second term, the state government has set up an Ecological and Rural Tourism Council and will identify 75 villages for the promotion of rural tourism. The government has also decided to make these Mangal Dals more proactive.

The government has decided to provide special training to members of the Yuvak and Mahila Mangal Dals as part of the promotion of rural tourism and economic policy.

They will be trained to promote local tourism by showcasing indigenous and specialty products, handicrafts, processed foods, clothing and other traditional products made by local artisans, especially in villages and rural areas.

“The progress of the villages is essential if the whole state wants to progress. Each village has its own identity which needs to be recognized and promoted,” said Mukesh Kumar Meshram, Principal Secretary, Tourism and Culture.

“The government is trying to develop the villages as ‘tourist hubs’ and expand facilities for the convenience of tourists,” Meshram added.

“This initiative will not only highlight the tourism potential of remote and neglected areas, but will also help create job opportunities for locals,” he said.

According to the tourism department, there are 78,000 registered Mangal Dals in the state.

Of this total, 42,000 are Yuvak Dals and 36,000 are Mahila Dals. These groups, formed by the Department of Youth Protection, include members in the 15-35 age group.

These dals have contributed effectively during initiatives like Fit India, Namami Gange, tree planting, blood donation camps and also during the Covid-19 pandemic.

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Tamarind, a vital cog in Chhattisgarh’s rural economy https://indicerural.com/tamarind-a-vital-cog-in-chhattisgarhs-rural-economy/ Sun, 01 May 2022 23:41:59 +0000 https://indicerural.com/tamarind-a-vital-cog-in-chhattisgarhs-rural-economy/

As tamarind is an important minor forest product, there is a minimum support price of Rs 36 per kg for seeds. It guarantees a fair price to the tribal gatherers for their work., writes Deepanwita Gita Niyogi

On a hot afternoon in Metapal village in Dantewada district, petty trader Ranat Kumar was busy buying tamarind from tribal collectors and storing it in sacks. It was the day of the weekly market, locally known as haat bazaar in Metapal, a predominantly tribal village in southern Chhattisgarh. In the middle of his transaction with a tribal collector, Kumar informed that the tamarind fetched Rs 30 per kg while weighing the product on a scale.

During the period of collection and sale of minor forest products, traders like Kumar visit villages or flock to rural markets. Tamarind provides tribal families with a viable livelihood option in the state. “It is a busy day for me and my business keeps me busy during the tamarind collection season which starts from mid-March and continues almost until April-May,” Kumar said.

In the middle of the conversation, Ungo Veko, a tribal man from the nearby village of Mandoli, approached Kumar with tamarind. Much of the tamarind collected in Dantewada eventually reaches the main market in Jagdalpur, the district seat of Bastar, about an hour’s drive away.

A bit away from Kumar, another trader, Sukhdev Sinha, said the produce is also sold in Geedam block of Dantewada district, while some quantity is kept in cold storage for future use. He added that a lot of effort goes into collecting, drying and extracting the seeds.

Tamarind produced in Chhattisgarh is in high demand in southern states like Andhra Pradesh, where seeded tamarind is sold at Rs 80 per kg. Kumar, however, admitted to keeping a minimal profit margin. “Traders like me are making profits in the range of Re 1 to Rs 2 per kg of tamarind we buy from collectors, even though prices are high in the south. We also don’t have time to extract the seeds.

Self-help groups enlisted

In the Katekalyan neighborhood of Dantewada, a 10-member women’s self-help group called Ramkrishna Susahayta Samuh buys tamarind from tribal pickers. Before the formation of the group, its members were mainly engaged in agricultural activities. But the women have made a valuable contribution during the Covid-19 period by visiting tribal homes and offering money to collectors to buy tamarind. In about 15 days in March this year, the group procured tamarind worth Rs 17 lakh.

As tamarind is an important minor forest product, there is a minimum support price or MSP which stands at Rs 36 per kg for seeds. MSP assures a fair price to the tribal gatherers for their work.

Shakuntala Thakur, who leads the self-help group in Katekalyan, said it was formed in 2014. “But our activities picked up during the pandemic when we approached tribal women directly with money which helped them. during the hard times,” she added, pointing to bags of tamarind neatly stacked in a corner of her home. Women’s self-help groups have been set up to weed out petty traders who often offer less than the MSP.

Lalit Manjhi, a Dantewada range ranger, said the money for the purchase of tamarind was given by the forest department. Manjhi and other field staff have been on strike since March 21. However, this did not affect fundraising as the money was given to self-help groups before the strike began. He also admitted that small traders like Kumar often prove to be a problem and women’s groups have to compete with them.

Because tamarind trees are huge, pickers often shake the lower branches with wooden planks to make sure the fruit falls to the ground. After that, the ground is cleared of dead leaves and the harvested tamarind is kept in baskets. Later, it is sold in rural markets or collected door-to-door by women’s self-help groups. In Dantewada, there are 88 such groups to collect.

Dantewada Divisional Forestry Officer Sundeep Balaga said collection of minor forest products has been going on for two years intensively through women’s groups. “The penetration of self-help groups has accelerated since Covid-19. But this year, the collection as such was not affected by the staff strike, even if the transport was a little affected in a few places.

In Dantewada, the tamarind collection target this year stands at 20,000 quintals and the collection at the time of filing the story stood at 4,935 quintals.

Role of minor forest products

In the tribal villages of Chhattisgarh, rural communities depend on the collection and sale of small forest products for their livelihood throughout the year. These include Tendu leaves, Sal seeds, tamarind, and mahua flowers, among many others. The collection and sale of minor forest products is part of the Centre’s Van Dhan program which aims to improve tribal incomes. TRIFED is spearheading the implementation of Van Dhan across India.

As for Chhattisgarh, there are about 18 minor forest products traded. To give a boost to all minor forest products, a total of 139 primary processing centers have been identified in the state. In 2020, amid the lockdown, around 51,000 quintals of tamarind were procured worth Rs 15.80 crore. Women’s self-help groups played a central role.

Outside Dantewada in Gariyaband district, 95 km from Raipur, tamarind production exceeded 2,500 quintals, Divisional Forest Officer Mayank Agrawal said. The last collection date was April 15.

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Opinions invited on how to make the most of the rural economy https://indicerural.com/opinions-invited-on-how-to-make-the-most-of-the-rural-economy/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 14:38:04 +0000 https://indicerural.com/opinions-invited-on-how-to-make-the-most-of-the-rural-economy/

Individuals, businesses, groups and organizations are all invited to help finalize how to get the most out of Staffordshire’s rural economy over the next decade.

Two of the key areas include Leek and Cheadle in Staffordshire.

After preliminary work with a wide range of bodies, Staffordshire County Council is releasing the draft Rural Economic Strategy for final comment.

The focus is on developing townships, improving rural infrastructure and encouraging innovation and sustainable growth.

Philip White, Deputy Leader of Staffordshire County Council and Cabinet Member for Economy and Skills, said: ‘There is already an economic strategy for the whole of the county, which has a focus on urban areas, so this part is specifically about how we deliver benefits to rural communities.

“Staffordshire’s continued economic growth relies in part on ensuring that there is a collective plan for these towns and villages and that the diversity of businesses within them are able to make the most of funding and investment opportunities. as they arise.

“After consulting with businesses, groups and organisations, and local councils, we believe this plan is in good shape, but it is not set in stone and we still want people to contribute to the version final.”

The five key areas are:

  • Support the regeneration of Cheadle, Leek, Rugeley, Stone and Uttoxeter as places to live and invest;
  • Reviving and developing the visitor economy by supporting tourism businesses and quality accommodation;
  • Support sustainable intensification of agriculture, including diversification, carbon reduction and succession planning for the next generation;
  • Stimulate enterprise and innovation;
  • Improve rural digital connectivity and access to opportunities through improved digital and energy infrastructure, as well as low-carbon transport.

With around 80% of Staffordshire classed as rural, this area is responsible for over half of the county’s economic output.

Mr White added: ‘Staffordshire’s rural economy strikes a good balance between traditional land-based industries such as agriculture and forestry, as well as sectors such as manufacturing, construction, services, food production and tourism.

“This strength is underpinned by excellent traditional and specialist universities and colleges and there is a skilled and well-educated workforce ready to go.

“The challenge is to agree on a clear path forward so that we can follow a common plan in the years to come to remove the barriers preventing further progress.”

People can have their say on the rural strategy by visiting: https://preview-staffscc.cloud.contensis.com/Business/Economic-and-Rural-Economic-Strategies/Rural-Economic-Strategy.aspx

The website also contains links to consultations on Staffordshire’s wider economic strategy, which focuses on economic growth priorities for the county as a whole.

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Dunne calls for a new government strategy for the rural economy https://indicerural.com/dunne-calls-for-a-new-government-strategy-for-the-rural-economy/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 12:07:48 +0000 https://indicerural.com/dunne-calls-for-a-new-government-strategy-for-the-rural-economy/

South Shropshire MP Philip Dunne joined calls for a white paper on the rural economy at the launch of a new report by the All Party Parliamentary Group on Rural Power Station in Parliament on Wednesday.

Philip Dunne has joined calls for a rural economy white paper

The report presents a blueprint for economic growth in rural communities, transforming the lives of millions of people who live and work in the countryside. The report makes 27 recommendations on how to close the rural productivity gap, adding a potential £43 billion to UK GVA a year.

The report concludes that no government in recent memory has had a program to unlock the economic and social potential of the countryside and explains how to improve the productivity of rural businesses. The rural economy is currently 18% less productive than the national average. Closing this gap would add £43 billion to the UK economy. Evidence from more than 50 agencies revealed that planning, taxation, connectivity, skills, agricultural policy and lack of ministerial leadership are holding back the rural economy.

Mr Dunne, who chairs the APPG on Rural Services, said:

“It is time to be ambitious for the rural economy. I know rural businesses in South Shropshire have great potential to grow, create jobs and make an even greater contribution to our communities. We need to identify the barriers they face and remove them. This is why I support calls for the announcement of a White Paper on the rural economy in the next Queen’s Speech.

Key policy recommendations for boosting rural productivity include:

  • Planning – the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) should prioritize small-scale progressive development in rural areas, particularly those with populations under 3,000, with an emphasis on affordable housing.
  • Whitehall- an inter-departmental working group led by the ministry with a specific mandate to develop and implement measures to boost rural productivity should be established, rural protection policy should be reformed and strengthened, and Defra objectives should be reviewed, including rural productivity in its terms of reference.
  • Agriculture – to alleviate labor shortages, the pilot project on seasonal workers should be extended and the number of visas available increased from 30,000 to 80,000, and address low prices in supply chains by implementing Farm Bill 2020 regulations to limit the influence of large supermarkets.
  • Tax – Simplify the tax system for diversified businesses through the Rural Business Unit (RBU), which would allow rural businesses to make their own decisions, reduce bureaucracy, increase tax collection for the Treasury, and remove barriers to growth of new business ventures.
  • Connectivity – DCMS and industry should produce an accessible roadmap for the hardest-to-reach 15% of households, with tangible goals for those left behind.
  • Skills – The government should provide vouchers to rural businesses to stimulate demand for business, technical and environmental training, and develop a natural capital skills strategy to identify skills shortages and how to address them.
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Rural economy 18% less productive than national average, parliamentary group report finds https://indicerural.com/rural-economy-18-less-productive-than-national-average-parliamentary-group-report-finds/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 09:03:11 +0000 https://indicerural.com/rural-economy-18-less-productive-than-national-average-parliamentary-group-report-finds/

The All Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on the Rural Powerhouse has released a report on how to upgrade the rural economy.

It follows one of the most comprehensive inquiries ever by a parliamentary body into his health.

Testimonials from over 50 organizations
The APPG collected testimonials from more than 50 industry bodies, charities, campaign groups, businesses, academics and business leaders.

The report concludes that no government in recent memory has had a program to unlock the economic and social potential of the countryside.

As a result, the rural economy is 18% less productive than the national average – a gap which, if reduced, could add £43billion to the UK economy.

Report findings
The report’s findings included:

  1. A broken planning system has failed those who live and work in rural areas.
  2. Defra lacks the political levers to bring about meaningful change in the rural economy.
  3. Lack of skills is causing a rapid “brain drain” in rural areas.
  4. Urgent action is needed to address labor shortages and supermarket pricing powers.
  5. The government is renouncing its commitments to provide full fiber and 4G to all.
  6. The tax system discourages investment and business diversification.

Robust: lays out a comprehensive growth plan
Julian Sturdy, co-chair of the APPG on Rural Business and the Rural Powerhouse and MP for York Outer, said:

“This report lays out a comprehensive growth plan that will create jobs, expand opportunities and strengthen small towns and villages across the country.

“We recognize the unique set of challenges the government is currently facing, but that makes the need to develop and strengthen the rural economy more important, not less important.”

Dillington: an economic model
APPG on Rural Business and the Rural Powerhouse co-chair, Lord Cameron of Dillington, said:

“It is vital that the government understands that rural Britain is not a museum, but rather an important part of the national economy which deserves a chance to succeed.

“The report provides an economic blueprint that will help any government seize the capabilities of the countryside and create the long-term economic growth needed to stimulate/enrich/strengthen our rural communities – in a cost effective and timely manner.”

Tufnell: Can no longer afford to ignore potential of rural economy
Mark Tufnell, President of the Country Land and Business Association (CLA), which represents thousands of farmers, landowners and rural businesses, said:

“The country can no longer afford to ignore the potential of the rural economy and the prospects of the millions of people who live there. Rural businesses are poised to grow, creating good jobs and opportunities for people from all walks of life, but lack of government interest is holding them back.

“Houses are often unaffordable for local families. Well-paying jobs can be rare. And broadband can be extremely slow. All of this leads to an exodus of talent who are too often forced to move to more urban areas.

Omissions in the Leveling Up White Paper
The report’s findings were further compounded by the launch of the government’s white paper, Leveling Up, which made no mention of creating prosperity and economic growth in rural communities and did not include any specific policies to create it.

The British government’s lack of ambition leaves it facing political consequences.

Changing political voting habits
A recent poll commissioned by the CLA highlighted changing political voting habits in rural areas. In previous general elections, 46% of correspondents had voted Conservative.

Voters’ intention is now 36% Labor and 38% Conservative, representing a change of 7.5%. The two parties are now neck and neck before the local elections.

The APPG report is intended to serve as an economic model for the campaign. Recognizing the impact of the pandemic on the country’s finances, most of the recommendations are low-cost, requiring only a change in policy – ​​and, in many cases, a change in how the government thinks about campaigning.

Key reforms needed
Key policy reforms to boost rural productivity include:

  • Planning – the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) should prioritize progressive small-scale development in rural areas, especially those with populations under 3,000, with an emphasis on affordable housing.
  • Whitehall- an inter-ministerial and inter-departmental working group with the specific mission of developing and implementing measures to boost rural productivity must be set up, the rural protection policy must be reformed and strengthened and the objectives of Defra must be reviewed, with rural productivity now included in its terms of reference.
  • Agriculture – to alleviate labor shortages, the pilot project on seasonal workers should be extended and the number of visas available increased from 30,000 to 80,000, and address low prices in supply chains by implementing Farm Bill 2020 regulations to limit the influence of large supermarkets.
  • Tax – Simplify the tax system for diversified businesses through the Rural Business Unit (RBU), which would allow rural businesses to make their own decisions, reduce bureaucracy, increase tax collection for the Treasury, and remove barriers to growth of new business ventures.
  • Connectivity – DCMS and the industry must produce an accessible roadmap for the hardest-to-reach 15% of homes, with tangible goals for those who remain.
  • Skills – the government should provide vouchers to rural businesses to stimulate demand for business, technical and environmental training, and develop a natural capital skills strategy to identify skills shortages and how to address them.

For more information on the CLA and its work, visit website and follow @CLASudEst on Twitter.


News shared by Michael on behalf of Country Land and Business Association. Ed

Picture: Dan Meyers below DC BY 2.0

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National homelessness project to develop rural economy pending https://indicerural.com/national-homelessness-project-to-develop-rural-economy-pending/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 08:36:39 +0000 https://indicerural.com/national-homelessness-project-to-develop-rural-economy-pending/

The government is embarking on a national rural telephony and national roaming project for rural communities without a stable connection to the mobile network.

The project, which should cover all rural communities in the country, will begin this year.

Communications and Digitalization Minister Ursula Owusu-Ekuful said the project will open up rural people to the national economy and facilitate access to government services, especially for business purposes.

She revealed this during the commissioning of the ICT cyber laboratory for the Methodist Basic School of Nkoranza, the rural telephone site of Boabeng Fiema and the rural telephone project of Chirehin in the Bono East region.

“We are determined to ensure that the digital economy is felt in all parts of this country, which is why the government will support all partners and the Ghana Electronic Communications Investment Fund (GIFEC). We are embarking on an aggressive rural telephony and national roaming project.

This will ensure that every corner of the country has access to the mobile network – both voice and data. It will also accelerate rural economic growth and also open up the economy to our rural and underserved populations,” she said.

The establishment of the project sites was funded by GIFEC under the Ghana Rural Telephony and Digital Inclusion Project.

Bono East Regional Minister Kwasi Adu-Gyan took the opportunity to remind the community of the importance of the facilities.

He assured that the regional coordinating council will work diligently with the local assemblies to ensure that they are well used.

Speaking on the tourism potentials of the region, he pointed out the poor nature of the roads to some tourist spots in the region like the Boabeng Fiema Monkey Sanctuary.

However, he noted that efforts are being made to give them a facelift and complement ongoing projects in the region.

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