Linking Human Security and Sustainable Rural Development in South Asia « Khabarhub

South Asia advocated for human security, actively promoting it using the multi-stakeholder approach.

She has long shared the importance of ensuring human security. The development of rural communities in South Asia has not only led to socio-economic improvement, but has had implications for social, economic and environmental systems.

Rural development in South Asia is less progressive because most community organizations are said to be inactive.

In addition, a lack of sense of ownership in development programs, the community’s increasing dependence on external aid, and the community’s perceived lack of development have contributed to underdevelopment, resulting in the human insecurity in rural South Asia.

The political security of the rural community is only truly reflected when it has access to local government decision-making with freedom of choice in the selection of its representatives to the Union Parishad.

In general, the right to security of person is associated with liberty and includes the right, if one is unlawfully imprisoned, to a remedy of habeas corpus. Security of the person can also be seen as an extension of rights based on the prohibition of torture and cruel and unusual punishment.

The formal justice system in South Asia is under enormous pressure with a heavy workload and an insufficient number of officials and staff to deal with cases.

Intrinsically, people yearn for peace, human rights, prosperity and social equity, but achieving them in the face of today’s complex challenges is beyond the reach and capacity of any single institution or institution. of a single actor.

A related criticism of the informal justice system is that it has little appreciation for the rule of law and is used to enforce often backward standards.

South Asia is a disaster-prone country and vulnerability to disasters poses a threat to human security. Human security is threatened as the disaster renders the community without food or shelter, impoverished, sick and displaced.

The South Asian government is working to ensure that its rural population has access to basic health care and health services by establishing primary health care centers.

The role of NGOs in promoting primary health services for mothers and children is notable. One of his responsibilities is to ensure the health security of the rural population, which is a difficult task given that only 30% of South Asia lives in cities and the infrastructure is limited and the lack of professionals health in rural areas.

The food security situation in rural South Asia has improved somewhat over the years and further improvements in access and utilization, to be sustained and at scale, require efforts. renewed from government, civil society organizations and development partners.

The pandemic has shown us the importance of being collectively prepared in the event of a crisis. Only such an approach can deliver win-win policies for people, planet and prosperity.

This pandemic also presents us with an opportunity to take a hard look at the sustainability of our environmental, economic and social systems to create more resilient societies with a focus on the successful implementation of the SDGs.

The SDGs highlight the need for an inclusive and localized approach where the promise to leave no one behind is anchored at the heart of local government.

Achieving the SDGs requires contextualizing development priorities and programs, while local government is best placed to implement policies and programs to improve service delivery that can fight poverty, reduce inequality and climate vulnerability, and promoting gender equity.

Grassroots participatory local government is essential for achieving the SDGs, especially in poor and marginalized regions of South Asia.

In the wake of the COVID pandemic, people-centred development is at the heart of the discourse, as this approach has emerged at the forefront of international development discourse centered on self-reliance, self-reliance and community living. in a spirit of unity, of social justice. , and participatory decision-making.

Unfortunately, this is far from being a reality in most developing countries. For example, best practices recognized by the international community, such as standing committees, project implementation committees, grassroots political participation or open budget discussions, are not widely used in local governments.

Moreover, the COVID pandemic has certainly intensified the vulnerabilities of local government bodies to deliver the best in achieving the SDGs.

Intrinsically, people yearn for peace, human rights, prosperity and social equity, but achieving them in the face of today’s complex challenges is beyond the reach and capacity of any single institution or institution. of a single actor.

This requires partnerships between a wide range of stakeholders within an overarching development framework such as the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

The evolving crisis has been characterized by politicians, academics and the media as the most perilous threat to human progress, peace, prosperity and stability since World War II.

The crisis allows us to rethink the elevation of human security in the lives of people and not in the weapons that states have.

Simply put, the human security approach recognizes the need to transcend fragmented responses in favor of people-centred, holistic, context-specific and prevention-focused solutions that leave no one behind.

As a multidimensional analytical framework, it strengthens the links between peace, development and human rights, and stimulates meaningful partnerships between United Nations entities, governments, civil society, the private sector and communities. to speed up delivery, limit duplication and maximize the reach of scarce resources Resources.

Last but not least, strong local government with adequate resources, devolution of powers and a positive mindset of political leaders in developing countries severely affected by the COVID pandemic are essential for the localization of the SDGs and the improvement of governance at the local level. .

Applying the human security approach enables a stronger integrated response that forges alliances to address current and emerging challenges more effectively together than alone.

In the wake of the COVID pandemic, people-centred development is at the heart of the discourse, as this approach has emerged at the forefront of international development discourse centered on self-reliance, self-reliance and community living. in a spirit of unity, of social justice. , and participatory decision-making.

The South Asian government is working hard to align its new action plan with the cutting edge of contemporary development discourse to regain confidence in the implementation of the SDGs amid the COVID pandemic.

As COVID-19 upends lives and livelihoods across the country, governments must focus on a range of multilateral solutions to ease the pain, while getting back on track to achieve the SDGs.

If the 2030 global agenda is implemented at the local level based on partnership with people from all segments of society, massive socio-economic, environmental and ecological development will occur and the targets of the SDGs will then be easily reached.

The SDG localization plan would be a quick remedy to counter the fallout from Covid-19 in the medium and long term. The expansion of human security depends on sustainable development.

The gap between the poor and the rich must be reduced. Creating equalities and social justice can help reduce conflict between urban and rural areas.

Last but not least, strong local government with adequate resources, devolution of powers and a positive mindset of political leaders in developing countries severely affected by the COVID pandemic are essential for the localization of the SDGs and the improvement of governance at the local level. .

(Dr. Mohammad Tarikul Islam is Associate Professor of Government and Politics at Jahangirnagar University)

About Keneth T. Graves

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